Espresso helps rollups:
Scale
01
Decentralize
02
Interoperate
03
The Espresso Sequencer is designed to offer rollups a means of achieving credible neutrality, enhanced interoperability, & long-term alignment with Ethereum.
A decentralized sequencer and data availability system connecting layer-2 scaling solutions
Scale without
compromise
The Espresso Sequencer’s optimistic responsiveness guarantees fast transaction finality and throughput limited only by network bandwidth.
Perfectly paired
with Ethereum
HotShot, our consensus protocol, scales to tens of thousands of nodes while maintaining strong performance to enable participation of Ethereum’s full validator set.
Interoperability
at its best
The Espresso Sequencer, shared across multiple rollups, makes cross-chain messaging and bridging cheaper, faster, and safer.
Espresso sequencer for
L2 Rollups
Accelerate your decentralization roadmap, inherit security from Ethereum, and interoperate more reliably with other rollups.
Participate as L2 Rollup
Espresso sequencer for
App Developers
Offer app developers more reliable and neutral infrastructure. No more single points of failure.
Espresso sequencer for
End Users
No compromises. High performance, low (and fair) fees, a diversity of applications, and no lock-in.
Monolithic
Today’s rollup teams develop and maintain all components as a singular package - not modular systems that could easily be swapped or upgraded.
Siloed
Rollups operate in their own silos, introducing all the same issues of interoperability that L1s have experienced.
Centralized
From sequencing to execution and proving, today's rollups are all run and maintained by their own teams - sacrificing credible neutrality and monopoly-resistance.
Shared sequencing
Many rollups leverage the benefits of the Espresso Sequencer, creating efficiencies for interoperability & beyond.
Decentralization
A permissionless network of nodes running the Espresso Sequencer offers robust data availability and transaction ordering.
SCALE
HotShot Consensus is optimistically responsive, so rollups don't compromise on high throughput or fast finality.
Easy integration
The Espresso Sequencer is designed to work seamlessly with existing rollup frameworks and other modular systems.
Proposer-Builder Separation
Espresso Sequencer is designed to be compatible with proposer-builder separation, a paradigm that supports mitigation of the harmful effects of MEV.
Agnostic Ordering
Designed to work with any approach to transaction ordering, from First Come First Serve to MEV-optimized.
Cross-Rollup Building
Block builders across multiple rollups only need to coordinate with one proposer, enabling them to guarantee order and outcomes.
Execution and Outcomes
With block builders integrated, users will receive guarantees of transaction inclusion and execution across multiple rollups.
Participate as
L2 Rollup
If you are building a rollup, we want to work with you.
For support in integrating with us, get in touch here.
Participate as Node Operator
If you’d like to help secure the Espresso Sequencer and have experience running node infrastructure, please reach out.
News & Brews
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Article
Node operator open application begins for Espresso Sequencer Cappuccino testnet

As the Espresso Sequencer edges closer to a production launch, we are looking to onboard more node operators to support our journey towards building a fully permissionless, credibly neutral interoperability layer for rollups.

The Espresso Sequencer runs on HotShot, a consensus protocol designed specifically to prioritize the high throughput and fast pre-confirmations that users have come to expect from rollups. The Espresso Sequencer also targets Ethereum-level security by scaling to thousands of nodes, while also enabling Ethereum validators to participate in securing the Espresso Sequencer network through Ethereum restaking.

Further decentralizing the Espresso Sequencer

Our current and fourth testnet, Gibraltar, is the first shared sequencer network run with external node operators. We have partnered with Blockdaemon, an industry leading public infrastructure company, to run four Espresso Sequencer nodes across North America, Asia, and Europe. This testnet release also sees the Espresso Sequencer support four rollup stacks (Arbitrum, Cartesi, Optimism and Polygon zkEVM) and several collaborations with rollup projects (see our ecosystem map). You can learn more about the Gibraltar release here.

In our upcoming fifth testnet, Cappuccino, we are looking to further decentralize the sequencer by onboarding more entities to run Espresso Sequencer nodes. We are excited to invite node operators to apply to run sequencer nodes on Cappuccino, which is scheduled for release in late Q1 2024.

Cappuccino will enable us to continue developing a seamless node onboarding process. As part of these efforts, we will provide basic metrics such as peer count, synchronization speed, stats on finalized blocks (time, number of transactions, size, etc.) as well as more advanced metrics that will be required for node operators participating in the Espresso Sequencer’s operation.

Cappuccino will implement other roadmap milestones such as fee payments, key management tooling, and verifiable information dispersal, which uses erasure coding to allow nodes to vote on a block without needing to download the whole block.

If you are interested in running an Espresso Sequencer for the Cappucinno testnet, please consider applying here.

Node operator expectations and specifications

We expect Cappuccino to run with approximately 100 nodes that are geographically dispersed, spanning several cloud and bare metal environments. We are looking to partner with organizations who will run nodes during our testnet, provide user feedback, and help us refine node specifications and onboarding for future releases.

Node operators will be expected to set up and run the testnet and provide occasional DevOps support during the Cappuccino testnet deployment. To support the onboarding process, selected node operators will be provided with technical documentation, an onboarding guide, and a metrics API. Espresso Systems will support node operators by providing documentation, a shared Slack channel, and incident response via on-call procedures.

Node technical specifications

The Espresso Sequencer supports a basic module for nodes participating in consensus and data availability (DA). There are additional, optional modules to run an HTTP server that comes with healthcheck and version endpoints, a query service for history, filesystem and SQL storage, submitting a transaction for sequencing, and checking status.

It is also possible to run a DA node. DA nodes will need to store a certain number of blocks at a time on-demand until an archival node can obtain the DA data, with rough guidelines on storage in the below specifications. Non-DA nodes have no need to persist block data and therefore have negligible storage requirements.

Hardware requirements are still in flux as we refine our testnets and add new features, but for now we recommend the following:

  • RAM: 16–32 GB.
  • CPU: 2–4 cores.
  • Storage (DA node): 20 GB minimum, ability to scale to 3 TB on demand.
  • Storage (non-DA node): Negligible, 10s-100s of bytes.

The detailed expected technical specifications for the Cappuccino testnet are available here.

Timeline

We are opening up the application process for node operators for two weeks, from February 2 until February 16, 2024. We’ll aim to announce selected node operators by the middle of March 2024.

To show prospective node partners what it’s like running an Espresso Sequencer node, we’ll be hosting an AMA with the Blockdaemon team in our Discord on February 6, 2024 at 11 AM EST. We’ll outline the experience of onboarding as a node operator partner, the support model Espresso Systems provides, and what you can expect if you are selected to run an Espresso Sequencer node. If you’re interested in running an Espresso Sequencer node, please consider attending.

We’re looking forward to hearing from those interested in running an Espresso Sequencer node! Please note that although we will not be able to respond to all applicants individually, we will share progress updates and selection decisions in our Discord via the #node-operators-updates channel.

The node operator questionnaire for the Cappuccino testnet is available here.

Article
Gibraltar Testnet Sees External Operators Running Espresso Sequencer Nodes

Espresso Systems releases testnet 4 (Gibraltar), showcasing an integration with the Arbitrum technology stack

Today, we are unveiling the fourth testnet of the Espresso Sequencer, Gibraltar. This testnet showcases a new integration with the Arbitrum technology stack and sees external operators running Espresso Sequencer nodes for the first time.

We’re excited to be supporting the Arbitrum ecosystem with a shared sequencer option that will provide Arbitrum technology chains with improved interoperability and decentralization, while maintaining the lightning-fast experience their users are accustomed to.

The Espresso Sequencer is a credibly neutral, fast-finality layer that any rollup can leverage for transaction ordering, data availability, and fast pre-confirmations. The sequencer protocol leverages HotShot consensus, enabling it to scale to thousands of nodes while still providing near-instantaneous pre-confirmations.

For this testnet release, we’ve been working closely with the Blockdaemon team who is managing external sequencer nodes for Gibraltar. We are thrilled to see Gibraltar become the first shared sequencer network running with external node operators.

This release is available to the public. The code we have developed to integrate with the Arbitrum tech stack is available on GitHub. As a part of this release, we have also published documentation that will enable developers and users alike to interact with Gibraltar and its integrated rollups.

If you are building a rollup, you can get started on your integration with the latest Espresso testnet here and reach out to collaborate with us here.

Gibraltar running on external node operators

We have partnered with Blockdaemon, a blockchain infrastructure provider, who is supporting us by deploying external sequencer nodes. They will be managing 4 sequencer nodes that are based in Europe and Asia. This collaboration sees the Espresso Sequencer make progress in decentralizing the network, and become more resilient and geographically distributed.

We’ll be hosting an AMA with the Blockdaemon team in our Discord on February 6, 2024 at 11 AM EST to share our progress in onboarding external node operators the Espresso Sequencer network. We’ll also hear from the Blockdaemon team about their experience as an Espresso Sequencer node operator. If you’re interested in running an Espresso Sequencer node, you’ll definitely want to attend.

Integration with Arbitrum stack

In September, we announced a partnership with Offchain Labs to explore decentralized, shared sequencing for Arbitrum technology chains. As a part of the Gibraltar testnet, we’re unveiling a new integration between the Espresso Sequencer and the Arbitrum technology stack.

Arbitrum technology chains will now have access to fast, decentralized shared sequencing. Arbitrum Orbit chains can integrate with the Espresso Sequencer today, and see how its preconfirmations are comparable to those of a centralized sequencer.

The integration of the Espresso Sequencer into the Arbitrum tech stack follows the announcement of our co-authored roadmap for decentralized Timeboost, a modified first-come-first-serve transaction ordering policy.

As we work with Offchain Labs on R&D efforts related to decentralized Timeboost, we are also exploring how the Espresso Sequencer can best serve as a neutral fast finality and interoperability layer for Arbitrum Orbit chains and the Arbitrum ecosystem. Another benefit of this integration is that it also gives the Espresso Systems and Offchain Labs teams an environment where we deploy decentralized Timeboost for testing.

Arbitrum Orbit chains can deploy their rollups on the Gibraltar testnet today by following the steps in our integration guide.

Caldera deploys Arbitrum rollup, Milan, integrated with Espresso Sequencer

Users and developers can submit transactions to the Milan rollup co-deployed with Caldera today. The Milan rollup is live and processing transactions, and users can easily interact with the rollup through their MetaMask wallet.

Developers can also deploy contracts to the Milan rollup by following the instructions listed in Caldera’s documentation.

AltLayer’s Arbitrum rollup, Kyoto, coming soon

AltLayer will also be releasing an Arbitrum rollup, called Kyoto, deployed on the Espresso Sequencer as a part of this public release. We will release more details on Kyoto when it is live and in production.

We’re excited to be working with the Caldera and AltLayer teams on deploying multiple rollups to the Espresso Sequencer!

Supporting shared sequencing for the Polygon zkEVM stack, OP Stack, Cartesi Stack, and Arbitrum technology chains

With the Arbitrum stack integration in Gibraltar, users can now submit transactions for rollups built on the Polygon zkEVM stack, Cartesi Stack, OP Stack, and Arbitrum technology chains. This now means that users of any rollup technology stack can enjoy the fast pre-confirmations the Espresso Sequencer enables.

If you’d like to try submitting transactions or deploying contracts to any of the integrated stacks on the Gibraltar testnet, you can head to our documentation site where we outline how you can get started. You may also build and run a local devnet of Gibraltar by following instructions in our GitHub.

Join the Espresso Ecosystem

The Gibraltar release follows our Cortado (testnet 3) release in September, 2023. Cortado was the first publicly available shared sequencer testnet, integrating with both the Polygon zkEVM and OP Stacks. Now, with the Arbitrum stack integration, we continue to support various rollup stacks and showcase how the Espresso Sequencer can provide credibly neutral, decentralized, shared sequencing for any number of rollups.

Be sure to follow along on Twitter/X and at our website for further updates on Gibraltar and our collaboration with Offchain Labs.

If you’re interested in deploying on the Gibraltar testnet, please get in touch with us here.

Article
Gibraltar testnet sees External Operators running Espresso Sequencer nodes

Espresso Systems releases testnet 4 (Gibraltar), showcasing an integration with the Arbitrum technology stack

Today, we are unveiling the fourth testnet of the Espresso Sequencer, Gibraltar. This testnet showcases a new integration with the Arbitrum technology stack and sees external operators running Espresso Sequencer nodes for the first time.

We’re excited to be supporting the Arbitrum ecosystem with a shared sequencer option that will provide Arbitrum technology chains with improved interoperability and decentralization, while maintaining the lightning-fast experience their users are accustomed to.

The Espresso Sequencer is a credibly neutral, fast-finality layer that any rollup can leverage for transaction ordering, data availability, and fast pre-confirmations. The sequencer protocol leverages HotShot consensus, enabling it to scale to thousands of nodes while still providing near-instantaneous pre-confirmations.

For this testnet release, we’ve been working closely with the Blockdaemon team who is managing external sequencer nodes for Gibraltar. We are thrilled to see Gibraltar become the first shared sequencer network running with external node operators.

This release is available to the public. The code we have developed to integrate with the Arbitrum tech stack is available on GitHub. As a part of this release, we have also published documentation that will enable developers and users alike to interact with Gibraltar and its integrated rollups.

If you are building a rollup, you can get started on your integration with the latest Espresso testnet here and reach out to collaborate with us here.

Gibraltar running on external node operators

We have partnered with Blockdaemon, a blockchain infrastructure provider, who is supporting us by deploying external sequencer nodes. They will be managing 4 sequencer nodes that are based in Europe and Asia. This collaboration sees the Espresso Sequencer make progress in decentralizing the network, and become more resilient and geographically distributed.

We’ll be hosting an AMA with the Blockdaemon team in our Discord on February 6, 2024 at 11 AM EST to share our progress in onboarding external node operators the Espresso Sequencer network. We’ll also hear from the Blockdaemon team about their experience as an Espresso Sequencer node operator. If you’re interested in running an Espresso Sequencer node, you’ll definitely want to attend.

Integration with Arbitrum stack

In September, we announced a partnership with Offchain Labs to explore decentralized, shared sequencing for Arbitrum technology chains. As a part of the Gibraltar testnet, we’re unveiling a new integration between the Espresso Sequencer and the Arbitrum technology stack.

Arbitrum technology chains will now have access to fast, decentralized shared sequencing. Arbitrum Orbit chains can integrate with the Espresso Sequencer today, and see how its preconfirmations are comparable to those of a centralized sequencer.

The integration of the Espresso Sequencer into the Arbitrum tech stack follows the announcement of our co-authored roadmap for decentralized Timeboost, a modified first-come-first-serve transaction ordering policy.

As we work with Offchain Labs on R&D efforts related to decentralized Timeboost, we are also exploring how the Espresso Sequencer can best serve as a neutral fast finality and interoperability layer for Arbitrum Orbit chains and the Arbitrum ecosystem. Another benefit of this integration is that it also gives the Espresso Systems and Offchain Labs teams an environment where we deploy decentralized Timeboost for testing.

Arbitrum Orbit chains can deploy their rollups on the Gibraltar testnet today by following the steps in our integration guide.

Caldera deploys Arbitrum rollup, Milan, integrated with Espresso Sequencer

Users and developers can submit transactions to the Milan rollup co-deployed with Caldera today. The Milan rollup is live and processing transactions, and users can easily interact with the rollup through their MetaMask wallet.

Developers can also deploy contracts to the Milan rollup by following the instructions listed in Caldera’s documentation.

AltLayer’s Arbitrum rollup, Kyoto, coming soon

AltLayer will also be releasing an Arbitrum rollup, called Kyoto, deployed on the Espresso Sequencer as a part of this public release. We will release more details on Kyoto when it is live and in production.

We’re excited to be working with the Caldera and AltLayer teams on deploying multiple rollups to the Espresso Sequencer!

Supporting shared sequencing for the Polygon zkEVM stack, OP Stack, Cartesi Stack, and Arbitrum technology chains

With the Arbitrum stack integration in Gibraltar, users can now submit transactions for rollups built on the Polygon zkEVM stack, Cartesi Stack, OP Stack, and Arbitrum technology chains. This now means that users of any rollup technology stack can enjoy the fast pre-confirmations the Espresso Sequencer enables.

If you’d like to try submitting transactions or deploying contracts to any of the integrated stacks on the Gibraltar testnet, you can head to our documentation site where we outline how you can get started. You may also build and run a local devnet of Gibraltar by following instructions in our GitHub.

Join the Espresso Ecosystem

The Gibraltar release follows our Cortado (testnet 3) release in September, 2023. Cortado was the first publicly available shared sequencer testnet, integrating with both the Polygon zkEVM and OP Stacks. Now, with the Arbitrum stack integration, we continue to support various rollup stacks and showcase how the Espresso Sequencer can provide credibly neutral, decentralized, shared sequencing for any number of rollups.

Be sure to follow along on Twitter/X and at our website for further updates on Gibraltar and our collaboration with Offchain Labs.

If you’re interested in deploying on the Gibraltar testnet, please get in touch with us here.

Article
Espresso Systems and Offchain Labs Release R&D Roadmap for Decentralized Timeboost

At Permissionless II, Espresso Systems and Offchain Labs announced that we partnered to bring a decentralized version of Timeboost transaction ordering and the Espresso Sequencer to the Arbitrum ecosystem and beyond.

Timeboost is a transaction ordering policy, originally developed by Offchain Labs, designed to protect users from frontrunning and mitigate against the harmful effects of maximal extractable value (MEV). The Espresso Sequencer is a protocol that supports rollups in achieving interoperability, fast finality, and decentralization without sacrificing scale. While the Espresso Sequencer can support a range of transaction ordering policies chosen by rollups, Espresso Systems is glad to be putting resources behind state-of-the art approaches like Timeboost.

To keep the Arbitrum and Ethereum communities up to date on our progress, we are releasing a proposed roadmap for the development of decentralized Timeboost and its compatibility with the Espresso Sequencer. Our goal with this roadmap is to share the milestones for development, including when rollups will be able to begin integrating with decentralized Timeboost.

What is Timeboost?

Timeboost is a transaction ordering policy that operates on a modified first-come-first-serve basis. In Timeboost, users may bid and pay a priority fee to have their transaction preferentially ordered. When a user submits a transaction it is guaranteed that (a) the transaction will be included in a block in the near future, and (b) that the transactions within the block will be ordered by descending priority fee. Timeboost mitigates front-running risk by keeping the mempool secret, leveraging an encrypted mempool in the decentralized version so that the sequencer protocol (e.g., whether centralized or BFT consensus) commits the ordering of transactions before the transaction contents are revealed.

This approach produces a number of desirable benefits for Ethereum rollups. The secret mempool ensures that attackers (including malicious participants in the sequencing protocol) cannot leverage their knowledge of transaction contents to frontrun other users. Meanwhile, basing transaction order within a block on a priority fee mitigates against “latency racing” behavior. Latency racing refers to sophisticated users deploying high amounts of capital to host their servers close to sequencer nodes to get their transactions ahead of others. Timeboost encourages MEV searchers to compete by paying priority fees rather than racing, generating additional revenue for the rollup. Other goals of the protocol include offering strong liveness properties, low latency, and censorship resistance. These features align well with the properties that the Espresso Sequencer provides.

As we work through finalizing design considerations for decentralized Timeboost, our teams have the following goals:

  • Satisfying Timeboost requirements with low latency for the decentralized committee resulting in relatively fast Timeboost blocks.
  • Achieving fast finality on the order of transactions while providing as much interoperability across rollups as possible.

These goals ensure fast finality of transactions and interoperability with other rollups while ensuring Timeboost’s ordering requirements.

Architectural Considerations

The Espresso Sequencer is built on top of the HotShot consensus protocol. While HotShot does not natively implement any advanced ordering policy beyond basic economic properties that come from decentralization, rollups may choose to use alternative approaches to their ordering policy to manage or mitigate MEV.

We wrote previously about the derivation pipeline and how individual rollups may define their own canonical way to derive, interpret, and ultimately execute a subsequence of transactions that the Espresso Sequencer has finalized as an abstract datastream. However, a standard derivation pipeline is a fixed, deterministic function of the Espresso Sequencer output stream, and is thus limited in its ability to implement advanced ordering policies like Timeboost. In other words, once a rollup defines its derivation pipeline then the proposers/builders of Espresso Sequencer blocks can fully predict and manipulate the order in which transactions will be executed by this rollup. To enable some rollups to adopt Timeboost without enshrining it within the Espresso Sequencer (i.e., without forcing it upon all users of the Espresso Sequencer), we need to augment the derivation pipeline for these rollups giving it some minimal non-deterministic control over the order in which these rollups will execute their transactions.

One such minimal adjustment is to introduce an external mechanism, implemented by a Timeboost committee, that decides where to draw the boundaries between blocks within the Espresso Sequencer output stream. The ability to draw boundaries is the only additional non-determinism necessary for Timeboost. The ordering of transactions within each of these “Timeboost blocks” is deterministic, based on filtering invalid transactions and sorting the remaining valid transactions by descending priority fee. Moreover, the committee need not run a full consensus protocol to finalize the boundaries — once proposed, HotShot itself can be leveraged to facilitate agreement. Other rollups that are using the Espresso Sequencer but not adopting Timeboost can ignore the Timeboost block boundaries for the purpose of deriving their own transaction sequences.

Users of rollups that have adopted Timeboost would have the option to threshold encrypt their transactions for frontrunning protection. The Timeboost committee would be both responsible for threshold decryption and trusted not to collude to learn the transaction contents before the order has been finalized, including the block boundaries. Ideally, users would only need to believe that at most f committee members will behave dishonestly (e.g., f is a third of the committee).

Finalizing the Timeboost boundaries inside HotShot has additional advantages beyond the convenience of maintaining a single consensus protocol. Given that Timeboost nodes are expected to communicate with each other with low latency and do significantly more computation than Espresso Sequencer nodes, the Timeboost protocol will be less decentralized, both in terms of the number of nodes and their resource requirements. While the Timeboost nodes may be elected by one or a few rollup communities based on trust considerations, the Espresso Sequencer promises to engender trust much more broadly based on economic security akin to Ethereum.

In particular, this is important for bridging and other forms of interoperability between rollups that have adopted Timeboost and those that have not. Bridges or builders interacting with the Espresso Sequencer may use information about the Timeboost boundaries to take actions on other rollups conditional on the state of Timeboost rollups. For example, a HotShot leader may produce (or auction off the right to produce) consecutive blocks during its turn in which the first block finalizes a Timeboost block while freezing other rollup states, and the second block updates the states of these other rollups conditioned on the new state of the Timeboost rollups. The proposer/builder would wait to learn the threshold decryption of the Timeboost block before constructing the second block. This capability is important for atomic transactions, which are bundles of transactions on multiple rollups that need to be sequenced together, a feature that the Espresso Sequencer facilitates in general as described in this post.

Additional considerations include:

  • Information symmetry: Ensuring that everyone (or at least any ecosystem actor who might contribute to building the next block) learns the decryption of the previous Timeboost block sufficiently long before the next block boundary is determined so that they have time to submit transactions for the next Timeboost block based on their knowledge of the current state.
  • Low-latency confirmation: Timeboost blocks are finalized quickly.
  • No long delays: Any transaction submitted to the system is not delayed for too long before being included in a Timeboost block, as long as it correctly pays a posted base fee.

While a mechanism to agree on block boundaries adds minimal complexity, an alternative design would have the Timeboost committee run its own consensus protocol to agree on entire blocks, which get passed to the Espresso Sequencer for ultimate finalization. The main advantage of this alternative design is providing blazingly fast pre-confirmations to users who trust the Timeboost committee for finality (even faster than what the Espresso Sequencer can provide).

As our teams further work out the specific protocol design for decentralized Timeboost, we are discussing the protocol’s latency requirements, and how that balances with other considerations around liveness and committee size.

Roadmap & Next Steps

Our roadmap for Timeboost development is milestone based, and development will begin after our teams work through the final details of the proposed design for decentralized Timeboost.

  • Offchain Labs and Espresso Systems collaboratively begin discussions around decentralized Timeboost’s design and present initial design considerations to the Arbitrum community.
  • Espresso Systems is building an Espresso Sequencer integration with the Arbitrum technology stack in our upcoming testnet (Gibraltar) to demonstrate technical compatibility and allow developers to experiment with a live demonstration of the Espresso Sequencer.
  • Both teams’ research teams are undertaking R&D efforts around decentralized Timeboost. During this period, we are continuing to scope out decentralized Timeboost’s desired properties. We are aiming to finalize the architecture and technical specifications for a decentralized Timeboost.
  • Decentralized Timeboost is in development as a module supporting integration with the Espresso Sequencer. After developing the protocol, we aim to test it and ensure it is ready for a production deployment.
  • After development and testing, we will make the decentralized Timeboost builder protocol available to rollups using the Espresso Sequencer.

We’re glad to be developing the decentralized Timeboost protocol alongside the Espresso Sequencer. We are excited that this work marks an important step towards building a credibly neutral, user-first transaction layer for all Ethereum rollups.

This development marks the first stage of development in our collaboration with the Offchain Labs team. As we build out decentralized Timeboost, we’ll update the Arbitrum and Ethereum ecosystems on our progress via the Arbitrum Research Forum. We look forward to collaborating with the community to gather feedback around decentralized Timeboost’s specifications and design.

If you’re building in the Arbitrum and Ethereum ecosystems and are interested in integrating with the Espresso Sequencer, please get in touch with us here.

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